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Sanja Lukić, MA
Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade
Republic of Serbia

 

THE IMAGE OF YUGOSLAV SOCIETY IN THE MAGAZINES LIFE AND TIME 1945–1980

Vol. XLII, 1/2024, pp. 183-198
https://doi.org/10.29362/ist20veka.2024.1.luk.183-198

 

ABSTRACT/RESUME:

The representation of Yugoslavia and its populace in Life and Time magazines from the end of World War II until the rise of the Communist Party of Yugoslavia in 1945 and the subsequent death of President Josip Broz Tito in 1980 was characterized by fluctuations that aligned with the volatility of relations between Washington and Belgrade. The accession of the communist regime to power was viewed as a foreseeable outcome, as the population of this region of Europe, due to their impoverished and uneducated state, was believed to be ill-equipped to comprehend and embrace the concept of democracy. Consequently, individuals were selectively chosen to be depicted in a positive light when Yugoslavia was once again considered an ally following the conflict with the Cominform in 1948. Nevertheless, the representation of the Yugoslav people was brief and superficial, lacking in any true endeavor to demonstrate empathy for their situation and hardships. In spite of efforts to showcase certain favorable aspects, the representation of Yugoslavia that evolved over time in the magazines was predominantly consistent with the Cold War preconceptions that Americans associated with communism. This representation was infused with elements of nineteenth-century imperial Balkanism, indicating that Life and Time were disinclined to deviate far from the predetermined framework and societal roles assigned to them.

 

KEYWORDS: Life, Time, Yugoslavia, USA, the image of Other, imagology, Cold War

 

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